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Controlling the grey market for guns PDF Print E-mail
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Monday, 26 July 2010 19:43

By Shantanu Nandan Sharma
The Economic Times Bureau
Sunday, July 25, 2010

When Mahendra Singh Dhoni applied to buy a 9 mm pistol, it triggered a riot of redtapism in his home state of Jharkhand. He was made to run from pillar to post for several months, before his application was sent to Delhi’s North Block, the union home ministry headquarters, for final approval. The captain of the national cricket team finally received the licence for the bore, but not before two years of paperwork and a controversy over the authorities demanding, among other things, his character certificate!

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Lobbyists for RKBA in the land of Mahatma PDF Print E-mail
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Friday, 25 June 2010 19:20

By Jeremy Page
The Times, South Asia Correspondent
Thursday, June 24, 2010

It’s another painfully slow day at the Singh Arms Corporation, a musty, one-room gun shop near Kashmir Gate in Old Delhi that dates to the birth of modern India in 1947. Charan Pal Singh Ghei sits alone at his desk, surrounded by ancient glass cabinets full of shotguns, hunting rifles, pistols and revolvers.

On the wall above hang three Mughal-era matchlocks once owned by the Maharajah of Uppal. Gathering dust in a corner near by is a British Snider Enfield rifle dated 1857 — the year of the Indian Mutiny. “This is a dying trade,” says Mr Ghei, 76, the shop’s owner and head of the All India Arms Dealers Association. “Even my own son doesn’t want to take it over.” The problem, he explains, is that although Indians have had the right to buy and bear guns since 1959, it can take two years to get a shotgun licence, and longer still for a handgun.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 August 2010 19:28
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Gun rights movement in India underscores important point PDF Print E-mail
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Tuesday, 09 February 2010 09:28

By Kurt Hofmann
St. Louis Examiner
Tuesday, February 9, 2010

A recent Washington Post article notes a nascent gun rights advocacy movement in India.

In the land of Mahatma Gandhi, Indian gun owners are coming out of the shadows for the first time to mobilize, U.S.-style, against proposed new curbs on bearing arms.

Then again, "nascent" is perhaps not an accurate characterization of gun rights advocacy in India.  Gandhi himself, after all, famously said that:

Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the Act depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest.

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New groups mobilize as Indians embrace the right to bear arms PDF Print E-mail
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Tuesday, 02 February 2010 19:05

By Rama Lakshmi
Washington Post Foreign Service
Monday, February 1, 2010


In the land of Mahatma Gandhi, Indian gun owners are coming out of the shadows for the first time to mobilize, U.S.-style, against proposed new curbs on bearing arms.

When gunmen attacked 10 sites in Mumbai in November 2008, including two five-star hotels and a train station, Mumbai resident Kumar Verma sat at home glued to the television, feeling outraged and unsafe.

Before the end of December, Verma and his friends had applied for gun licenses. He read up on India's gun laws and joined the Web forum Indians for Guns. When he got his license seven months later, he bought a black, secondhand, snub-nose Smith & Wesson revolver with a walnut grip.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 18 August 2010 19:14
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